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In recent years, states like Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Kansas have modernized their wine regulations to encourage more choice, convenience, and better pricing for consumers. In fact, 42 of 50 states now allow wine to be sold at retail food stores, but Kentucky is not one of them. Kentucky’s grocers say that wine is one of the most frequently requested items in Kentucky groceries. Unfortunately, consumers are not allowed to purchase wine in Kentucky grocery stores. With surveys showing nearly 65% of Kentuckians support wine sales in groceries, it’s time for a change.

STATES ALLOW WINE SALES AT GROCERY STORES.

ALL 7 STATES BORDERING KY ALLOW WINE SALES AT GROCERY STORES.

A SURVEY IN DECEMBER OF 2017 SHOWS NEARLY 65% SUPPORT FOR ALLOWING SALE OF WINE IN GROCERY STORES.

The law dealing with the sale of wine in pharmacies and grocery stores is an untouched relic of Prohibition, a step back in time to when prescriptions were obtained to buy alcohol at drug stores. It makes no sense in the context of today.
Shopping

How It Affects You:

You know the drill. You go to the grocery store and shop for everything you need. Bread, milk, butter, eggs, and maybe a bottle of wine to celebrate an occasion or to share with your family at the dinner table. You go to the beverage section of your local grocery store and you see a plethora of options for beer. The problem is, you are part of a growing segment of consumers who enjoy wine. For that purchase, consumers in Kentucky often must leave their local grocery and travel to another store or perhaps a pharmacy. Now, how does that make sense?
Toast

Wine and Food:

Wine enhances the dining experience and culinary traditions and winemaking go together. We’ve come a long way since the first wine was made in 6000 BC. Cooking shows have had an impact on the way people cook at home. Wine is more common at the dinner table and, as a result, is something that more consumers are thinking about simultaneously as they plan their meals. Nationally, 60 percent of wine consumers are women, and consumer data shows women tend to be the primary shoppers in their households. Kentucky needs to be offering more consumer choice to capture unrealized tax revenue and build upon our rich history of grape growing.
Competiiton

Consumers Win with Updates to our Prohibition-era Law:

Consumers should have the convenience of the free market and the benefit of competition when it comes to access and pricing.
Grapevine

How Kentucky Farmers Win by Updating our Outdated Law:

Kentucky is home to some of the best wines and most innovative winemakers in the country. To grow and prosper, Kentucky winemakers need to have the ability to market their product to more consumers. Kentucky’s farmers win by expanding the number of sales outlets for Kentucky-produced wine and building the demand for Kentucky-grown grapes.

The forgotten, storied history of Kentucky Wine

The first commercial vineyard in the country was founded in 1799 in Lexington and had the backing of Kentucky legends Daniel Boone & Henry Clay.

Prior to prohibition, Kentucky was one of the largest grape and wine producing states in the nation.

There are 3 categories of grapes grown in Kentucky: European (vinifera), French-American hybrids, and American/Native.

Wine’s Growing Place in the Kentucky economy:

There are over 75 wine producers across Kentucky. Over 10,000 jobs were created and supported by the wine industry in 2017. The wine industry generated $43.3 million in state consumption taxes, which includes excise and sales taxes. Experts believe that amount will increase with additional sale outlets.

Responsible Sales:

Kentucky grocers have been responsibly stocking and selling beer for decades. A store employee of legal age is required to conduct beer sales. The same would be true if grocers could stock and sell wine. In addition, Alcohol and Beverage Control authorities strictly monitor sales and any violators are subject to fines or license suspension.

Communities would continue to control wet/dry status:

Proposed updates to Kentucky law would still allow local communities to self-determine when it comes to wet or dry status. Wet/dry local option elections would not be impacted. The US wine industry is in the middle of its largest growth period in history. Consumer demand for wine is high among baby boomers and Millennials over 23 years old. For the industry as whole, sales are projected to continue to rise by 2 to 4 percent.

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